The Radical Pippi Longstocking

A new perspective on a child’s heroine.

Longreads

In Der Spiegel, Claudia Voigt looks at the life of Astrid Lindgren, a Swedish author best known for her Pippi Longstocking books. If you haven’t revisited the books recently, the exuberant Pippi lives on her own, does as she pleases, and describes herself as “the strongest girl in the world.” In short, she’s a radically independent, fabulously liberated leading lady, particularly for a children’s book published in 1945. But what inspired Lindgren to create such an iconoclastic protagonist?

There has been a great deal of research and academic discussion on what induced Lindgren to develop such a revolutionary and modern children’s book character. [Lindgren’s daughter] Karin Nyman remembers all too well that “there was a permanent sense of fear hanging over all of our lives,” even in Sweden. “The world was gripped by horror, and Pippi was a reaction to it. The stories were a way to oppose it, to give us…

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Author: danielrappletonyahoocom

Science - fiction, fantasy, horror & suspense ( But not really " nerd / geek " material ), armchair cultural anthropologist, interested in archaeology ( Although the closest I've been to an actual dig - site was Pinson Mounds outside Memphis ), & interested in the obscure, strange or sometimes things that would bore or put off other people.

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